Explore Aesthetic and Interpretive Inquiry (AII) WAYS Courses

Ways of Thinking/Ways of Doing

Titlesort descending Requirements
HISTORY 116M
"You Know Nothing, Jon Snow": Representations and Misrepresentations of the Middle Ages in Film
WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

Throughout the history of film, writers, directors and producers have made the Middle Ages one of the most popular settings featured in the medium. Some films attempt to faithfully represent this fascinating period in great historical detail. Other films use a deformed image of the Middle Ages as an inspiration for movies that propagate misleading depictions of this important time. Finally, most films could be placed somewhere on the spectrum between these two extremes. This class will examine eight films and one broad theme (e.g., violence, women, politics, etc.) featured in them. Through examination of primary and secondary sources, students will investigate these themes within the context of medieval history, critique their cinematic representation and discuss medievalism and its proponents.

HISTORY 16M
"You Know Nothing, Jon Snow": Representations and Misrepresentations of the Middle Ages in Film (HISTORY 116M)
WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

Throughout the history of film, writers, directors and producers have made the Middle Ages one of the most popular settings featured in the medium. Some films attempt to faithfully represent this fascinating period in great historical detail. Other films use a deformed image of the Middle Ages as an inspiration for movies that propagate misleading depictions of this important time. Finally, most films could be placed somewhere on the spectrum between these two extremes. This class will examine eight films and one broad theme (e.g., violence, women, politics, etc.) featured in them. Through examination of primary and secondary sources, students will investigate these themes within the context of medieval history, critique their cinematic representation and discuss medievalism and its proponents.

FEMGEN 152
'Tis all in pieces: Space and Gender on the Threshold of the Modern World (FEMGEN 252)
WAY-A-II

These dramatic words, spoken by the British poet John Donne, signal the onset of the Early Modern world and the profound reconfigurations of space and related structures of thought, including conceptions of the self and the encoding of gender roles. We will explore the vibrant Early Modern world in the context of space and representations of gender, sexuality, and race as manifest in unprecedented literary and artistic forms, such as Shakespeare¿s ¿Othello,¿ Marlowe¿s ¿Doctor Faustus,,¿ the poetry of John Donne, the art of Michelangelo and Caravaggio as well as key historical and cultural texts. And we will visit the Cantor Arts Center (on campus) for a guided tour and lecture on art and perspective. We also will read and discuss selected texts from the modern world, such as Samuel Beckett¿s ¿Waiting for Godot¿ and poetry and commentary by Adrienne Rich, to study both changes and continuities with the Early Modern period. We will consider the vital cognitive role of the reader or viewer in the formation of particular instances of artistic form, including recent---and highly thought-provoking---material from the neurosciences and cognitive studies.nnNote: Instructor will consider changes in meeting times/days to accommodate student schedules if feasible. Please send request to: hbrooks@stanford.edu.

FEMGEN 152
'Tis all in pieces: Space and Gender on the Threshold of the Modern World (FEMGEN 252)
WAY-A-II

These dramatic words, spoken by the British poet John Donne, signal the onset of the Early Modern world and the profound reconfigurations of space and related structures of thought, including conceptions of the self and the encoding of gender roles. We will explore the vibrant Early Modern world in the context of space and representations of gender, sexuality, and race as manifest in unprecedented literary and artistic forms, such as Shakespeare¿s ¿Othello,¿ Marlowe¿s ¿Doctor Faustus,,¿ the poetry of John Donne, the art of Michelangelo and Caravaggio as well as key historical and cultural texts. And we will visit the Cantor Arts Center (on campus) for a guided tour and lecture on art and perspective. We also will read and discuss selected texts from the modern world, such as Samuel Beckett¿s ¿Waiting for Godot¿ and poetry and commentary by Adrienne Rich, to study both changes and continuities with the Early Modern period. We will consider the vital cognitive role of the reader or viewer in the formation of particular instances of artistic form, including recent---and highly thought-provoking---material from the neurosciences and cognitive studies.nnNote: Instructor will consider changes in meeting times/days to accommodate student schedules if feasible. Please send request to: hbrooks@stanford.edu.

ARTHIST 57Q
10 American Photographs (AMSTUD 57Q)
WAY-A-II

Preference to sophomores. "The humor, the sadness, the EVERYTHING-ness and American-ness of these pictures!" wrote Jack Kerouac of photographer Robert Frank's iconic collection, The Americans. This seminar takes Kerouac's enthusiasm and applies it to ten American photographs, a new one each week. Examples span the medium's history and were taken as art, science, commerce, journalism, or personal mementos. Close study of the photo of the week will address how it looks and why; its history, from initial responses to later reception; and its relationship to the larger American visual and cultural context. Also under discussion: What story does this set of pictures tell about Americanness? What might another set of photos convey?

ARTHIST 57Q
10 American Photographs (AMSTUD 57Q)
WAY-A-II

Preference to sophomores. "The humor, the sadness, the EVERYTHING-ness and American-ness of these pictures!" wrote Jack Kerouac of photographer Robert Frank's iconic collection, The Americans. This seminar takes Kerouac's enthusiasm and applies it to ten American photographs, a new one each week. Examples span the medium's history and were taken as art, science, commerce, journalism, or personal mementos. Close study of the photo of the week will address how it looks and why; its history, from initial responses to later reception; and its relationship to the larger American visual and cultural context. Also under discussion: What story does this set of pictures tell about Americanness? What might another set of photos convey?

AMSTUD 57Q
10 American Photographs (ARTHIST 57Q)
WAY-A-II

Preference to sophomores. "The humor, the sadness, the EVERYTHING-ness and American-ness of these pictures!" wrote Jack Kerouac of photographer Robert Frank's iconic collection, The Americans. This seminar takes Kerouac's enthusiasm and applies it to ten American photographs, a new one each week. Examples span the medium's history and were taken as art, science, commerce, journalism, or personal mementos. Close study of the photo of the week will address how it looks and why; its history, from initial responses to later reception; and its relationship to the larger American visual and cultural context. Also under discussion: What story does this set of pictures tell about Americanness? What might another set of photos convey?

AMSTUD 57Q
10 American Photographs (ARTHIST 57Q)
WAY-A-II

Preference to sophomores. "The humor, the sadness, the EVERYTHING-ness and American-ness of these pictures!" wrote Jack Kerouac of photographer Robert Frank's iconic collection, The Americans. This seminar takes Kerouac's enthusiasm and applies it to ten American photographs, a new one each week. Examples span the medium's history and were taken as art, science, commerce, journalism, or personal mementos. Close study of the photo of the week will address how it looks and why; its history, from initial responses to later reception; and its relationship to the larger American visual and cultural context. Also under discussion: What story does this set of pictures tell about Americanness? What might another set of photos convey?

GERMAN 97
10 Poems That Will Change Your Life
WAY-A-II

This course is for anyone who has ever been afraid of poetry, anyone who has ever thought that poems are too difficult to understand, a course for anyone who has fallen in love with poetry before, and for anyone who has used a poem to make a difference in someone's life. You will learn how to read, understand, and if you don't already like poetry. We will read poems from different centuries, different kinds of writers, and different media (paper, computer screens, and even DNA); they will be about loss and love and war and loyalty and bacteria. Some of them will be about you. You will develop interpretive skills that come with this range of poetic forms and structures and will learn how to think about what it means for something to be poetic, whether it is a poem, a Leonard Cohen song, a last minute field goal, or a toilet. Can the poems in this class really change your life? (What would that even mean? We'll discuss.) Maybe; maybe not. But they're certainly going to try.

GERMAN 97
10 Poems That Will Change Your Life
WAY-A-II

This course is for anyone who has ever been afraid of poetry, anyone who has ever thought that poems are too difficult to understand, a course for anyone who has fallen in love with poetry before, and for anyone who has used a poem to make a difference in someone's life. You will learn how to read, understand, and if you don't already like poetry. We will read poems from different centuries, different kinds of writers, and different media (paper, computer screens, and even DNA); they will be about loss and love and war and loyalty and bacteria. Some of them will be about you. You will develop interpretive skills that come with this range of poetic forms and structures and will learn how to think about what it means for something to be poetic, whether it is a poem, a Leonard Cohen song, a last minute field goal, or a toilet. Can the poems in this class really change your life? (What would that even mean? We'll discuss.) Maybe; maybe not. But they're certainly going to try.

GERMAN 97
10 Poems That Will Change Your Life
WAY-A-II

This course is for anyone who has ever been afraid of poetry, anyone who has ever thought that poems are too difficult to understand, a course for anyone who has fallen in love with poetry before, and for anyone who has used a poem to make a difference in someone's life. You will learn how to read, understand, and if you don't already like poetry. We will read poems from different centuries, different kinds of writers, and different media (paper, computer screens, and even DNA); they will be about loss and love and war and loyalty and bacteria. Some of them will be about you. You will develop interpretive skills that come with this range of poetic forms and structures and will learn how to think about what it means for something to be poetic, whether it is a poem, a Leonard Cohen song, a last minute field goal, or a toilet. Can the poems in this class really change your life? (What would that even mean? We'll discuss.) Maybe; maybe not. But they're certainly going to try.

ITALIAN 129
19th and 20th Century Literature and Culture: Constructing and Re-Constructing Italy
GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

This course will explore 19th and 20th century Italian history through a literary and cinematic lens: the Italian Risorgimento and unification in the mid-19th century opened a series of debates that resonated throughout the 20th century and its political and social turns. By looking at several works of literature, essays, films, and graphic novels, students will reflect on the historical, political, and social dynamics that shaped the Belpaese in the past two centuries. The construction of modern Italy will be analyzed as both an ideological and aesthetic process, to provide students with a grasp of how Italian-ness has been shaped from the 19th century until today. This course is both an introduction to modern Italian literature and culture and a continuation of the study of the Italian language. All class discussion, reading, and writing in Italian. Prerequisites: ITALLANG 22A or equivalent.

ITALIAN 129
19th and 20th Century Literature and Culture: Constructing and Re-Constructing Italy
GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

This course will explore 19th and 20th century Italian history through a literary and cinematic lens: the Italian Risorgimento and unification in the mid-19th century opened a series of debates that resonated throughout the 20th century and its political and social turns. By looking at several works of literature, essays, films, and graphic novels, students will reflect on the historical, political, and social dynamics that shaped the Belpaese in the past two centuries. The construction of modern Italy will be analyzed as both an ideological and aesthetic process, to provide students with a grasp of how Italian-ness has been shaped from the 19th century until today. This course is both an introduction to modern Italian literature and culture and a continuation of the study of the Italian language. All class discussion, reading, and writing in Italian. Prerequisites: ITALLANG 22A or equivalent.

HISTORY 3S
A Global History of the Apocalypse: Millenarian Movements in the Modern World
WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

This course will examine the rise, fall, and legacy of modern millenarian movements-- movements that claim that our corrupt world is about to be swept away, to be replaced with a particular version of paradise-- in a global perspective. Drawing on an array of sources ranging from proclamations, diaries, criminal confessions, newspaper accounts, cartoons, songs, photographs, and films, we will explore what, if anything, these movements had in common, and their connections to and influences on one another.

OSPMADRD 87
A History of European Conservatism
WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

Origins and trajectories of conservative thought in Europe: how it emerged in response to, and in fact as a critique of, the ambitions of the French Revolution and the project of Enlightenment more generally. Readings in the history of conservative thought in Europe paired with texts (mostly speeches and editorials) by current or recent leaders who can be understood, or understood themselves, as in some way conservative (Rajoy, Sarcozy, Merkel, Cameron, Ratzinger). Trace lineage of current political ideas on the European right while charting the covert transformations undergone by a line of thinking that first emerged as a rejection of transformation.

COMPLIT 172
A History of Nature Through Literature and Art
WAY-A-II

In light of impending ecological collapse and climate catastrophe, eco-critics assert the need to abandon the concept of Nature. As it has developed in European literature and art, Nature "is an arbitrary rhetorical construct, empty of independent, genuine existence behind or beyond the texts we create about it" (Morton 22) What, then, is Nature? Does Nature exist outside of the texts and artwork that claim to represent it? What concepts can we develop to take its place? In this course, we will assess the history of Nature through European literature and art from the sixteenth century to the present day. Of particular focus will be the history of landscape painting, the pastoral tradition in the Renaissance, Enlightenment debates on the state of nature, Romantic poetry and the writings of Thoreau, John Muir, and Rachel Carson. Reading literature and art from a diversity of historical moments and cultural contexts permits a critical reassessment of our own conceptions of Nature and those of contemporary political and economic discourses. This course aims to empower students to construct their own conceptions of Nature and bring literature, history, and art to bear on contemporary debates about the environment and climate change, gender and sexuality, government and power.

HISTORY 201K
A History of the Global Left: Revolutionary Movements against Empire (HISTORY 301K)
WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

This class will trace the formation of trans-regional movements against imperialism in the modern period that helped create a "global Left." We will read contemporary works by thinkers such as Lord Byron, Karl Marx, Mohandas K. Gandhi, Annie Besant, and Faiz Ahmad Faiz, as well as historical studies of these figures and the movements in which they figured. Key topics include the American Revolution, the Indian "Mutiny" of 1857, the Ghadar movement, Pan-Islamism, Irish nationalism, and global communism.

OSPKYOTO 58
A Journey into the Buddhist Visual Arts of Japan
WAY-A-II

Impact of Buddhism on the arts and culture of Japan as seen in the ancient capital of Kyoto. Image production, iconography, representational strategies, as well as the ritual and visual functions of Buddhist sculpture and painting with a focus on selected historical temples and their icons. Also examination of architectural and landscape elements of temple layouts, within which iconographic programs are framed, images are enlivened, and practices centered on these devotional and ritual art.

OSPKYOTO 58
A Journey into the Buddhist Visual Arts of Japan
WAY-A-II

Impact of Buddhism on the arts and culture of Japan as seen in the ancient capital of Kyoto. Image production, iconography, representational strategies, as well as the ritual and visual functions of Buddhist sculpture and painting with a focus on selected historical temples and their icons. Also examination of architectural and landscape elements of temple layouts, within which iconographic programs are framed, images are enlivened, and practices centered on these devotional and ritual art.

OSPKYOTO 58
A Journey into the Buddhist Visual Arts of Japan
WAY-A-II

Impact of Buddhism on the arts and culture of Japan as seen in the ancient capital of Kyoto. Image production, iconography, representational strategies, as well as the ritual and visual functions of Buddhist sculpture and painting with a focus on selected historical temples and their icons. Also examination of architectural and landscape elements of temple layouts, within which iconographic programs are framed, images are enlivened, and practices centered on these devotional and ritual art.

ENGLISH 131C
A.I.: Artificial Intelligence in Fiction
WAY-A-II

From self-driving cars to bots that alter democratic elections, artificial intelligence is growing increasingly powerful and prevalent in our everyday lives. Fiction has long been speculating about the techno-utopia¿and catastrophe¿that A.I. could usher in. Indeed, fiction itself presents us with a kind of A.I. in the many characters that speak and think in its pages. So what constitutes an ¿intelligence¿ within literature or technology? In either field, is it ever possible to overcome the problem of other minds? Is there an ultimate boundary that demarcates bodies from machines? This course will begin with Mary Shelley¿s Frankenstein (1818) and Edgar Allan Poe¿s ¿Maelzel¿s Chess Player¿ (1836), then proceed through works such as Samuel Butler¿s Erewhon (1872), Isaac Asimov¿s I, Robot (1950), Stanley Kubrick¿s 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), and Stanford lecturer Scott Hutchins¿s A Working Theory of Love (2012), including a possible visit from Hutchins. Throughout, we will be asking ourselves what makes someone¿or something¿a person in our world today.

ENGLISH 131C
A.I.: Artificial Intelligence in Fiction
WAY-A-II

From self-driving cars to bots that alter democratic elections, artificial intelligence is growing increasingly powerful and prevalent in our everyday lives. Fiction has long been speculating about the techno-utopia¿and catastrophe¿that A.I. could usher in. Indeed, fiction itself presents us with a kind of A.I. in the many characters that speak and think in its pages. So what constitutes an ¿intelligence¿ within literature or technology? In either field, is it ever possible to overcome the problem of other minds? Is there an ultimate boundary that demarcates bodies from machines? This course will begin with Mary Shelley¿s Frankenstein (1818) and Edgar Allan Poe¿s ¿Maelzel¿s Chess Player¿ (1836), then proceed through works such as Samuel Butler¿s Erewhon (1872), Isaac Asimov¿s I, Robot (1950), Stanley Kubrick¿s 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), and Stanford lecturer Scott Hutchins¿s A Working Theory of Love (2012), including a possible visit from Hutchins. Throughout, we will be asking ourselves what makes someone¿or something¿a person in our world today.

ENGLISH 131C
A.I.: Artificial Intelligence in Fiction
WAY-A-II

From self-driving cars to bots that alter democratic elections, artificial intelligence is growing increasingly powerful and prevalent in our everyday lives. Fiction has long been speculating about the techno-utopia¿and catastrophe¿that A.I. could usher in. Indeed, fiction itself presents us with a kind of A.I. in the many characters that speak and think in its pages. So what constitutes an ¿intelligence¿ within literature or technology? In either field, is it ever possible to overcome the problem of other minds? Is there an ultimate boundary that demarcates bodies from machines? This course will begin with Mary Shelley¿s Frankenstein (1818) and Edgar Allan Poe¿s ¿Maelzel¿s Chess Player¿ (1836), then proceed through works such as Samuel Butler¿s Erewhon (1872), Isaac Asimov¿s I, Robot (1950), Stanley Kubrick¿s 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), and Stanford lecturer Scott Hutchins¿s A Working Theory of Love (2012), including a possible visit from Hutchins. Throughout, we will be asking ourselves what makes someone¿or something¿a person in our world today.

FRENCH 131
Absolutism, Enlightenment, and Revolution in 17th- and 18th-Century France
GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

The literature, culture, and politics of France from Louis XIV to Olympe de Gouges. How this period produced the political and philosophical foundations of modernity. Readings may include Corneille, Molière, Racine, Lafayette, Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau, Beaumarchais, and Gouges. Taught in French. Prerequisite: FRENLANG 124 or consent of instructor.

FRENCH 131
Absolutism, Enlightenment, and Revolution in 17th- and 18th-Century France
GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

The literature, culture, and politics of France from Louis XIV to Olympe de Gouges. How this period produced the political and philosophical foundations of modernity. Readings may include Corneille, Molière, Racine, Lafayette, Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau, Beaumarchais, and Gouges. Taught in French. Prerequisite: FRENLANG 124 or consent of instructor.

FRENCH 131
Absolutism, Enlightenment, and Revolution in 17th- and 18th-Century France
GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

The literature, culture, and politics of France from Louis XIV to Olympe de Gouges. How this period produced the political and philosophical foundations of modernity. Readings may include Corneille, Molière, Racine, Lafayette, Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau, Beaumarchais, and Gouges. Taught in French. Prerequisite: FRENLANG 124 or consent of instructor.

ARTHIST 155C
Abstract Expressionism: Painting/Modern/America (AMSTUD 155C)
WAY-A-II

The course will focus on American abstract painting from the 1930s to the 1960s, emphasizing the works of art at the Anderson Collection at Stanford. We will focus on looking closely at pictures by Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, Willem de Kooning, and other renowned abstract painters, developing skills of speaking and writing about these works of art. We will also place these pictures in their mid-20th century context: World War II and the Cold War; Hollywood and popular culture generally; Beat literature; and locations such as New York and San Francisco.

ARTHIST 155C
Abstract Expressionism: Painting/Modern/America (AMSTUD 155C)
WAY-A-II

The course will focus on American abstract painting from the 1930s to the 1960s, emphasizing the works of art at the Anderson Collection at Stanford. We will focus on looking closely at pictures by Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, Willem de Kooning, and other renowned abstract painters, developing skills of speaking and writing about these works of art. We will also place these pictures in their mid-20th century context: World War II and the Cold War; Hollywood and popular culture generally; Beat literature; and locations such as New York and San Francisco.

ARTHIST 155C
Abstract Expressionism: Painting/Modern/America (AMSTUD 155C)
WAY-A-II

The course will focus on American abstract painting from the 1930s to the 1960s, emphasizing the works of art at the Anderson Collection at Stanford. We will focus on looking closely at pictures by Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, Willem de Kooning, and other renowned abstract painters, developing skills of speaking and writing about these works of art. We will also place these pictures in their mid-20th century context: World War II and the Cold War; Hollywood and popular culture generally; Beat literature; and locations such as New York and San Francisco.

AMSTUD 155C
Abstract Expressionism: Painting/Modern/America (ARTHIST 155C)
WAY-A-II

The course will focus on American abstract painting from the 1930s to the 1960s, emphasizing the works of art at the Anderson Collection at Stanford. We will focus on looking closely at pictures by Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, Willem de Kooning, and other renowned abstract painters, developing skills of speaking and writing about these works of art. We will also place these pictures in their mid-20th century context: World War II and the Cold War; Hollywood and popular culture generally; Beat literature; and locations such as New York and San Francisco.

AMSTUD 155C
Abstract Expressionism: Painting/Modern/America (ARTHIST 155C)
WAY-A-II

The course will focus on American abstract painting from the 1930s to the 1960s, emphasizing the works of art at the Anderson Collection at Stanford. We will focus on looking closely at pictures by Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, Willem de Kooning, and other renowned abstract painters, developing skills of speaking and writing about these works of art. We will also place these pictures in their mid-20th century context: World War II and the Cold War; Hollywood and popular culture generally; Beat literature; and locations such as New York and San Francisco.

URBANST 182
Activating Urban Spaces: Materializing Hidden Narratives in the Urban Environment (ARTSINST 182)
WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

This course will investigate the organization and shaping of public space from the perspective of story and narrative. The course will consider how authorized narratives feature in the built environment and in the social spaces and usage of the city and how unauthorized, sometimes contentious narratives lurk beneath the surface and persist on the "skin" of the city. It will investigate the role of artists and the arts in "mapping" or surfacing alternative stories, concepts and imaginations of how the city is or can be. Inspired by the writings of Michel DeCerteau and Italo Calvino, this class explores the role of narrative in the city and the imagination from the perspective of cultural memory, lived experience, usage of space and organization of the built infrastructure. It offers an alternative approach to thinking about cities, how they are formed and how they function. This class will utilize and combine active field research methods with creative practice. Locations for our field research and excursions will include areas around Stanford and the Bay Area. The class will function as a hybrid seminar and collaborative studio workspace supporting students interested in applying creative practices to field research to develop methods for materializing narratives in various forms of public performance or place-specific art. Students will develop research for projects tailored to a particular location of their choosing and will explore the idea of the 'hidden city' its histories and its communities.

URBANST 182
Activating Urban Spaces: Materializing Hidden Narratives in the Urban Environment (ARTSINST 182)
WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

This course will investigate the organization and shaping of public space from the perspective of story and narrative. The course will consider how authorized narratives feature in the built environment and in the social spaces and usage of the city and how unauthorized, sometimes contentious narratives lurk beneath the surface and persist on the "skin" of the city. It will investigate the role of artists and the arts in "mapping" or surfacing alternative stories, concepts and imaginations of how the city is or can be. Inspired by the writings of Michel DeCerteau and Italo Calvino, this class explores the role of narrative in the city and the imagination from the perspective of cultural memory, lived experience, usage of space and organization of the built infrastructure. It offers an alternative approach to thinking about cities, how they are formed and how they function. This class will utilize and combine active field research methods with creative practice. Locations for our field research and excursions will include areas around Stanford and the Bay Area. The class will function as a hybrid seminar and collaborative studio workspace supporting students interested in applying creative practices to field research to develop methods for materializing narratives in various forms of public performance or place-specific art. Students will develop research for projects tailored to a particular location of their choosing and will explore the idea of the 'hidden city' its histories and its communities.

ARTSINST 182
Activating Urban Spaces: Materializing Hidden Narratives in the Urban Environment (URBANST 182)
WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

This course will investigate the organization and shaping of public space from the perspective of story and narrative. The course will consider how authorized narratives feature in the built environment and in the social spaces and usage of the city and how unauthorized, sometimes contentious narratives lurk beneath the surface and persist on the "skin" of the city. It will investigate the role of artists and the arts in "mapping" or surfacing alternative stories, concepts and imaginations of how the city is or can be. Inspired by the writings of Michel DeCerteau and Italo Calvino, this class explores the role of narrative in the city and the imagination from the perspective of cultural memory, lived experience, usage of space and organization of the built infrastructure. It offers an alternative approach to thinking about cities, how they are formed and how they function. This class will utilize and combine active field research methods with creative practice. Locations for our field research and excursions will include areas around Stanford and the Bay Area. The class will function as a hybrid seminar and collaborative studio workspace supporting students interested in applying creative practices to field research to develop methods for materializing narratives in various forms of public performance or place-specific art. Students will develop research for projects tailored to a particular location of their choosing and will explore the idea of the 'hidden city' its histories and its communities.

ARTSINST 182
Activating Urban Spaces: Materializing Hidden Narratives in the Urban Environment (URBANST 182)
WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

This course will investigate the organization and shaping of public space from the perspective of story and narrative. The course will consider how authorized narratives feature in the built environment and in the social spaces and usage of the city and how unauthorized, sometimes contentious narratives lurk beneath the surface and persist on the "skin" of the city. It will investigate the role of artists and the arts in "mapping" or surfacing alternative stories, concepts and imaginations of how the city is or can be. Inspired by the writings of Michel DeCerteau and Italo Calvino, this class explores the role of narrative in the city and the imagination from the perspective of cultural memory, lived experience, usage of space and organization of the built infrastructure. It offers an alternative approach to thinking about cities, how they are formed and how they function. This class will utilize and combine active field research methods with creative practice. Locations for our field research and excursions will include areas around Stanford and the Bay Area. The class will function as a hybrid seminar and collaborative studio workspace supporting students interested in applying creative practices to field research to develop methods for materializing narratives in various forms of public performance or place-specific art. Students will develop research for projects tailored to a particular location of their choosing and will explore the idea of the 'hidden city' its histories and its communities.

MUSIC 20B
Advanced Jazz Theory
GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

Approaches to improvisation through listening and transcribing, and developing familiarity with important contributors to this music. Topics: scale theory, altered dominants, and substitute harmony. Prerequisite: 20A or consent of instructor.

MUSIC 20B
Advanced Jazz Theory
GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

Approaches to improvisation through listening and transcribing, and developing familiarity with important contributors to this music. Topics: scale theory, altered dominants, and substitute harmony. Prerequisite: 20A or consent of instructor.

MUSIC 20B
Advanced Jazz Theory
GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

Approaches to improvisation through listening and transcribing, and developing familiarity with important contributors to this music. Topics: scale theory, altered dominants, and substitute harmony. Prerequisite: 20A or consent of instructor.

CLASSICS 103L
Advanced Latin: Bad Emperors: Tacitus and Suetonius on Nero
Language, WAY-A-II

Why was Nero remembered as a 'bad' emperor? Tacitus and Suetonius, who wrote the foremost histories of his life, described Nero's abuses and corruption in great detail. But what is the line between gossip and history? In this class, we will examine accounts of Nero's life as a way to understand the early imperial period and the later historians who chronicled it. We will read Suetonius's Life of Nero and then Tacitus Annals 14. In doing so, we will examine key questions of how Roman historians understood history-writing, political authority, power, liberty, gender roles, and morality. Select secondary readings will help shed light on whether portrayals of Nero's reign are fair based on current scholarly arguments. As context, we will discuss the roles of powerful women (Livia, Drusilla, Messalina, and Agrippina) as well as the post-Augustan Julio-Claudians (the other 'bad emperors'). If time permits, we will examine additional short readings from other sources such as Seneca's Apocolocyntosis. Readings will be in the original Latin. We will also examine the portrayal of emperors in popular media, particularly I, Claudius. As needed, we will review questions of grammar and syntax, rhetorical terms, and historical context. Classics majors and minors must take course for letter grade. May be repeated for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

CLASSICS 102L
Advanced Latin: Elegy (CLASSICS 209L)
Language, WAY-A-II

As needed, we will review questions of grammar and syntax, rhetorical terms, and historical context. Classics majors and minors must take course for letter grade. May be repeated for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

CLASSICS 103L
Advanced Latin: Livy
Language, WAY-A-II

Livy's Book VI tells the history of Republican Rome from 390 to 367 BCE, years of profound change in Roman society, while the city is reconstructed after being sacked by the Gauls. How does Livy make his story lifelike and convincing? What is the role of individuals in this narrative? How do moral readings of past events balance political ones? How does Livy involve his readers in reconstructing Rome and its past? Close attention to language, style and narrative techniques. Classics majors and minors must take course for a letter grade and may repeat for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

CLASSICS 102L
Advanced Latin: Ovid (CLASSICS 209L)
Language, WAY-A-II

In his Tristia and Epistulae ex Ponto, stemming from his banishment to the Black Sea coast in 8 CE, Ovid ostensibly addresses his wife, friends and patrons back in Rome, longing for the chance to return. These 'Sadnesses' and 'Letters from Pontus' use the same meter as his love poems, namely elegiac couplets, but by contrast they sound a nostalgic note. Ovid complains bitterly about conditions in his new location, so far from his beloved city of Rome. In reading a rich sample of these exile poems we'll assess the poet's self-representation, his apparent clash of art and politics, and more generally the nature of literary exile and cultural landscapes. As needed, we will review questions of grammar and syntax, rhetorical terms, and historical context. Classics majors and minors must take course for letter grade. May be repeated for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Sample reading: Ovid, Epistulae ex Ponto book 1 (ed. Garth Tissol, 2014).As needed, we will review questions of grammar and syntax, rhetorical terms, and historical context. Classics majors and minors must take course for letter grade. May be repeated for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

CLASSICS 102L
Advanced Latin: Rebel with a cause: Catiline
Language, WAY-A-II

(Formerly CLASSLAT 112.) Beguiling. Riotous. Fallen. Lucius Sergius Catilina (108-62 BCE): Who was he? Reading of selections of Cicero's Catilinarians and In Defense of Caelius, and Sallust's Catilinarian Conspiracy. We will compare the three different Catilinarian villains within the framework of rhetoric, Cicero's and Sallust's styles (esp. metaphors), and explore the historian's possible debts to the orator. As needed, we will review questions of grammar and syntax, rhetorical terms, and historical context. Classics majors and minors must take course for letter grade. May be repeated for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

PHIL 173W
Aesthetics (PHIL 273W)
WAY-A-II

This course will investigate a cluster of varied but related philosophical issues concerning the arts - music, painting, literature, poetry, photography, theater, film, etc.- issues most of which are, at the same time, problems in philosophy of mind or language, value theory, or epistemology. We will address questions like the following (though probably not all of them): What, if anything, is distinctive about art and aesthetic experience?, What is aesthetic value, and how do aesthetic values relate to and interact with moral values and values of other kinds?, What is fiction and why are people interested in it?, In what ways are works of art expressive of feelings or emotions? What similarities and differences are there in the expressive qualities of music, literature, painting, poetry? How might we learn from works of art of one or another kind, and how might they work to change people's perspectives or attitudes?, In what ways do artworks serve as vehicles of communication? Are the values of works of art fundamentally different from those of beautiful natural objects? Along the way, we will bump into more specific questions such as: Why and in what ways is photography more (or less) 'realistic' than painting and drawing, or more or less revealing of reality? Does (instrumental) music have cognitive or semantic content? Is music representational in anything like the ways literature and figurative painting are?, Do all literary works have narrators? Is there ever (or always?) anything like narrators in paintings, films, music? Prerequisite: One course in philosophy, or permission of the instructor.

PHIL 173W
Aesthetics (PHIL 273W)
WAY-A-II

This course will investigate a cluster of varied but related philosophical issues concerning the arts - music, painting, literature, poetry, photography, theater, film, etc.- issues most of which are, at the same time, problems in philosophy of mind or language, value theory, or epistemology. We will address questions like the following (though probably not all of them): What, if anything, is distinctive about art and aesthetic experience?, What is aesthetic value, and how do aesthetic values relate to and interact with moral values and values of other kinds?, What is fiction and why are people interested in it?, In what ways are works of art expressive of feelings or emotions? What similarities and differences are there in the expressive qualities of music, literature, painting, poetry? How might we learn from works of art of one or another kind, and how might they work to change people's perspectives or attitudes?, In what ways do artworks serve as vehicles of communication? Are the values of works of art fundamentally different from those of beautiful natural objects? Along the way, we will bump into more specific questions such as: Why and in what ways is photography more (or less) 'realistic' than painting and drawing, or more or less revealing of reality? Does (instrumental) music have cognitive or semantic content? Is music representational in anything like the ways literature and figurative painting are?, Do all literary works have narrators? Is there ever (or always?) anything like narrators in paintings, films, music? Prerequisite: One course in philosophy, or permission of the instructor.

HISTORY 145B
Africa in the 20th Century (AFRICAAM 145B)
GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

(Same as HISTORY 45B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 145B.) The challenges facing Africans from when the continent fell under colonial rule until independence. Case studies of colonialism and its impact on African men and women drawn from West, Central, and Southern Africa. Novels, plays, polemics, and autobiographies written by Africans.

HISTORY 145B
Africa in the 20th Century (AFRICAAM 145B)
GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

(Same as HISTORY 45B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 145B.) The challenges facing Africans from when the continent fell under colonial rule until independence. Case studies of colonialism and its impact on African men and women drawn from West, Central, and Southern Africa. Novels, plays, polemics, and autobiographies written by Africans.

HISTORY 145B
Africa in the 20th Century (AFRICAAM 145B)
GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

(Same as HISTORY 45B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 145B.) The challenges facing Africans from when the continent fell under colonial rule until independence. Case studies of colonialism and its impact on African men and women drawn from West, Central, and Southern Africa. Novels, plays, polemics, and autobiographies written by Africans.

AFRICAAM 145B
Africa in the 20th Century (HISTORY 145B)
GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

(Same as HISTORY 45B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 145B.) The challenges facing Africans from when the continent fell under colonial rule until independence. Case studies of colonialism and its impact on African men and women drawn from West, Central, and Southern Africa. Novels, plays, polemics, and autobiographies written by Africans.

AFRICAAM 145B
Africa in the 20th Century (HISTORY 145B)
GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

(Same as HISTORY 45B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 145B.) The challenges facing Africans from when the continent fell under colonial rule until independence. Case studies of colonialism and its impact on African men and women drawn from West, Central, and Southern Africa. Novels, plays, polemics, and autobiographies written by Africans.

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