Explore Creative Expression (CE) WAYS Courses

Ways of Thinking/Ways of Doing

Title Requirements
AFRICAAM 20A
Jazz Theory (MUSIC 20A)
GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

Introduces the language and sounds of jazz through listening, analysis, and compositional exercises. Students apply the fundamentals of music theory to the study of jazz. Prerequisite: 19 or consent of instructor.

AFRICAAM 20A
Jazz Theory (MUSIC 20A)
GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

Introduces the language and sounds of jazz through listening, analysis, and compositional exercises. Students apply the fundamentals of music theory to the study of jazz. Prerequisite: 19 or consent of instructor.

AFRICAAM 37
Contemporary Choreography: Chocolate Heads Performance Project (DANCE 30)
WAY-CE

Students from diverse dance styles (ballet to hip-hop to contemporary) participate in the dance-making/remix process and collaborate with musicians, visual artists, designers and spoken word artists, to co-create a multidisciplinary finished production and installation. Students of all dance or athletic backgrounds are welcome to audition on Wednesday (9/26) and Monday (10/1) during class time. Visual artists, musicians and dancers may also contact the instructor for further information at ahayes1@stanford.edu.

AFRICAAM 37
Chocolate Heads Performance Project: Dance & Intercultural Performance Creation (DANCE 30)
WAY-CE

Students from diverse dance styles (ballet to hip-hop to contemporary) participate in the dance-making/remix process and collaborate with musicians, visual artists, designers and spoken word artists, to co-create a multidisciplinary finished production and installation. Students of all dance or athletic backgrounds are welcome to audition on Wednesday (9/26) and Monday (10/1) during class time. Visual artists, musicians and dancers may also contact the instructor for further information at ahayes1@stanford.edu.

AFRICAAM 45
Dance Improvisation from Freestyle to Hip Hop (DANCE 45)
WAY-CE

This class is an arena for physical and artistic exploration to fire the imagination of dance improvisers, cultivate sensation and perception within and without studio practice and to promote interactive intelligence.nStudents will learn to harness and transform habitual movement patterns and dance trainings as resources for new ways of moving: expand their awareness of being a part of a bigger picture, while being attentive to everything all at once: and to use visual, aural and kinesthetic responses to convert those impulses into artistic material. Class will be accompanied by live and recorded music and include weekly jam sessions. Open to students from all dance, movement, athletic backgrounds and skill levels. Beginners welcome.

AFRICAAM 45
Dance Improv StratLab: Freestyle Improvisation from Contemporary to Hip Hop & Beyond (DANCE 45)
WAY-CE

This class is an arena for physical and artistic exploration to fire the imagination of dance improvisers, cultivate sensation and perception within and without studio practice and to promote interactive intelligence.nStudents will learn to harness and transform habitual movement patterns and dance trainings as resources for new ways of moving: expand their awareness of being a part of a bigger picture, while being attentive to everything all at once: and to use visual, aural and kinesthetic responses to convert those impulses into artistic material. Class will be accompanied by live and recorded music and include weekly jam sessions. Open to students from all dance, movement, athletic backgrounds and skill levels. Beginners welcome.

AMSTUD 134
Museum Cultures: Material Representation in the Past and Present (ARCHLGY 134, ARCHLGY 234, ARTHIST 284B, CSRE 134, EDUC 214, NATIVEAM 134)
WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

Students will open the "black box" of museums to consider the past and present roles of institutional collections, culminating in a student-curated exhibition. Today, museums assert their relevance as dynamic spaces for debate and learning. Colonialism and restitution, the politics of representation, human/object relationships, and changing frameworks of authority make museum work widely significant and consistently challenging. Through thinking-in-practice, this course reflexively explores "museum cultures": representations of self and other within museums and institutional cultures of the museum world itself.n3 credits (no final project) or 5 credits (final project). May be repeat for credit

AMSTUD 151F
Angelheaded Hipsters: Beat Writers of San Francisco and New York (ENGLISH 151F)
GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

Reading of central writers of the Beat movement (Ginsberg, Kerouac, di Prima, Snyder, Whalen) as well as some related writers (Creeley, Gunn, Levertov). Issues explored include NY and SF, Buddhism and leftist politics, poetry and jazz. Some exposure to reading poems to jazz accompaniment. Examination of some of the writers and performers growing out of the Beats: Bob Dylan, rock music, especially from San Francisco, and jazz.

AMSTUD 176B
Documentary Fictions
WAY-CE

More and more of the best American fiction, plays, and even comics are being created out of documentary practices such as in-depth interviewing, oral histories, and reporting. Novels like Dave Egger¿s What is the What, plays like Anna Deavere Smith's Twilight Los Angeles, and narrative journalism like Rebecca Skloot's The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, all act as both witnesses and translators of people's direct experience and push art into social activism in new ways. In this course students will examine the research methods, artistic craft, and ethics of these rich, genre-bending works and then create documentary fictions of their own. Readings will include works by Katherine Boo, G. B. Tran, and Charles Johnson, and author visits will include a master class with Rebecca Skloot. No prior creative writing or journalism experience required.

AMSTUD 186B
American Song in the 20th Century and after (MUSIC 186B, MUSIC 286B)
WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

Critical and creative exploration of song in the Americas. About twenty-five key examples will guide discussion of the interactions between words, music, performance and culture. Weekly listening, reading and assignments will be organized around central themes: love, sex and romance; war and politics; labor and money; place; identity; society and everyday life. Genres include art song; blues, gospel, jazz and country; pop, soul, rock and hip-hop; bossa nova, nueva canción and salsa; electronic and experimental. Takehome and in-class assignments will include critical and creative writing, and music composition, production and performance; final projects may emphasize any of the above.

AMSTUD 48N
The American Songbook and Love Poetry (ENGLISH 48N)
WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

A study of performances (Billie Holiday, Frank Sinatra etc) of songs by classic American composers (Porter, Rogers and Hart, Cohen).

AMSTUD 91A
Asian American Autobiography/W (ASNAMST 91A, CSRE 91D, ENGLISH 91A)
WAY-CE, WAY-ED

This is a dual purpose class: a writing workshop in which you will generate autobiographical vignettes/essays as well as a reading seminar featuring prose from a wide range of contemporary Asian-American writers. Some of the many questions we will consider are: What exactly is Asian-American memoir? Are there salient subjects and tropes that define the literature? And in what ways do our writerly interactions both resistant and assimilative with a predominantly non-Asian context in turn recreate that context? We'll be working/experimenting with various modes of telling, including personal essay, the epistolary form, verse, and even fictional scenarios. First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.

AMSTUD 91A
ASIAN-AMERICAN AUTOBIOGRAPHY/W (ASNAMST 91A, CSRE 91D, ENGLISH 91A)
WAY-CE, WAY-ED

This is a dual purpose class: a writing workshop in which you will generate autobiographical vignettes/essays as well as a reading seminar featuring prose from a wide range of contemporary Asian-American writers. Some of the many questions we will consider are: What exactly is Asian-American memoir? Are there salient subjects and tropes that define the literature? And in what ways do our writerly interactions both resistant and assimilative with a predominantly non-Asian context in turn recreate that context? We'll be working/experimenting with various modes of telling, including personal essay, the epistolary form, verse, and even fictional scenarios. NOTE: First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.

ANES 72Q
The Art of Medical Diagnosis
WAY-CE

The Art of Medical Diagnosis: Enhancing Observational Skills through the Study of Art is an interactive, multidisciplinary undergraduate course that explores various ways in which studying art increases critical observational skills vital for aspiring health care providers. Students will be introduced to the concept of `Visual Thinking Strategies¿ through classroom, art creation, and museum based activities. Students will apply these skills to both works of art and medical cases. Significant focus will be on engaging in group discussions where they will collaboratively use visual evidence to generate and defend hypothesis. Drawing and sketching from life will play a critical role in honing observational skills through weekly assignments, workshops, and a final project. The interactive nature of this course pivots students away from a typical lecture based course to a self-directed learning experience.

ANES 72Q
The Art of Medical Diagnosis
WAY-CE

The Art of Medical Diagnosis: Enhancing Observational Skills through the Study of Art is an interactive, multidisciplinary undergraduate course that explores various ways in which studying art increases critical observational skills vital for aspiring health care providers. Students will be introduced to the concept of `Visual Thinking Strategies¿ through classroom, art creation, and museum based activities. Students will apply these skills to both works of art and medical cases. Significant focus will be on engaging in group discussions where they will collaboratively use visual evidence to generate and defend hypothesis. Drawing and sketching from life will play a critical role in honing observational skills through weekly assignments, workshops, and a final project. The interactive nature of this course pivots students away from a typical lecture based course to a self-directed learning experience.

APPPHYS 100
The Questions of Clay: Craft, Creativity and Scientific Process (ARTSINST 100)
WAY-CE, WAY-SMA

Students will create individual studio portfolios of ceramic work and pursue technical investigations of clay properties and the firing process using modern scientific equipment. Emphasis on development of creative process; parallels between science and traditional craft; integration of creative expression with scientific method and analysis. Prior ceramics experience desirable but not necessary. Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: any level of background in physics, Instructor permission.

APPPHYS 100
The Questions of Clay: Craft, Creativity and Scientific Process (ARTSINST 100)
WAY-CE, WAY-SMA

Students will create individual studio portfolios of ceramic work and pursue technical investigations of clay properties and the firing process using modern scientific equipment. Emphasis on development of creative process; parallels between science and traditional craft; integration of creative expression with scientific method and analysis. Prior ceramics experience desirable but not necessary. Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: any level of background in physics, Instructor permission.

APPPHYS 10AX
The Expressive Vessel: An Immersive Introduction to Clay
WAY-CE

Students learn to make and to analyze functional ceramic forms with a focus on wheel-thrown pottery. Studio time dedicated to the acquisition and refinement of shaping, marking/glazing and finishing skills; supplementary lectures and discussions to explore contemporary studio ceramics and major historical traditions. No prior experience necessary; instructors will tailor assignments for students at all levels of ability.

APPPHYS 10AX
The Expressive Vessel: An Immersive Introduction to Clay
WAY-CE

Students learn to make and to analyze functional ceramic forms with a focus on wheel-thrown pottery. Studio time dedicated to the acquisition and refinement of shaping, marking/glazing and finishing skills; supplementary lectures and discussions to explore contemporary studio ceramics and major historical traditions. No prior experience necessary; instructors will tailor assignments for students at all levels of ability.

APPPHYS 10AX
The Expressive Vessel: An Immersive Introduction to Clay
WAY-CE

Students learn to make and to analyze functional ceramic forms with a focus on wheel-thrown pottery. Studio time dedicated to the acquisition and refinement of shaping, marking/glazing and finishing skills; supplementary lectures and discussions to explore contemporary studio ceramics and major historical traditions. No prior experience necessary; instructors will tailor assignments for students at all levels of ability.

ARCHLGY 134
Museum Cultures: Material Representation in the Past and Present (ARCHLGY 234, ARTHIST 284B)
WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

Students will open the "black box" of museums to consider the past and present roles of institutional collections, culminating in a student-curated exhibition. Today, museums assert their relevance as dynamic spaces for debate and learning. Colonialism and restitution, the politics of representation, human/object relationships, and changing frameworks of authority make museum work widely significant and consistently challenging. Through thinking-in-practice, this course reflexively explores "museum cultures": representations of self and other within museums and institutional cultures of the museum world itself.n3 credits (no final project) or 5 credits (final project). May be repeat for credit

ARCHLGY 134
Museum Cultures: Material Representation in the Past and Present (ARCHLGY 234, ARTHIST 284B)
WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

Students will open the "black box" of museums to consider the past and present roles of institutional collections, culminating in a student-curated exhibition. Today, museums assert their relevance as dynamic spaces for debate and learning. Colonialism and restitution, the politics of representation, human/object relationships, and changing frameworks of authority make museum work widely significant and consistently challenging. Through thinking-in-practice, this course reflexively explores "museum cultures": representations of self and other within museums and institutional cultures of the museum world itself.n3 credits (no final project) or 5 credits (final project). May be repeat for credit

ARTHIST 105B
Medieval Journeys: Introduction through the Art and Architecture (ARTHIST 305B, DLCL 123)
GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-CE, WAY-ED

The course explores the experience and imagination of medieval journeys through an interdisciplinary, cross-cultural, and skills-based approaches. As a foundations class, this survey of medieval culture engages in particular the art and architecture of the period. The Middle Ages is presented as a network of global economies, fueled by a desire for natural resources, access to luxury goods and holy sites. We will study a large geographical area encompassing the British Isles, Europe, the Mediterranean, Central Asia, India, and East Africa and trace the connectivity of these lands in economic, political, religious, and artistic terms from the fourth to the fourteenth century C.E. The students will have two lectures and one discussion session per week. Depending on the size of the class, it is possible that a graduate student TA will run the discussion session. Our goal is to give a skills-oriented approach to the Middle Ages and to engage students in creative projects that will satisfy either the Ways-Creative Expression requirement or Ways-Engaging Difference. NOTE: for AY 2018-19 HISTORY 115D Europe in the Middle Ages, 300-1500 counts for DLCL 123.

ARTHIST 225
Wonder, Curiosity & Collecting: Building a Stanford Cabinet of Curiosities (ARTHIST 425, HISTORY 205J, HISTORY 305J)
WAY-CE

(History 205J is an undergraduate course offered for 5 units; History 305J is a graduate course offered for 4-5 units.) Inside every museum lies a cabinet of curiosities. Explores the history of wonder, curiosity, and collecting, with special attention to the Renaissance origins of the cabinet of curiosities and their modern afterlives. Hands-on experience working with the Stanford collection in the Cantor to create a contemporary cabinet in collaboration with artist Mark Dion. This will be a unique opportunity to create a Stanford cabinet of curiosities for the twenty-first century. All seminar participants will contribute to the published exhibit catalogue.

ARTSINST 100
The Questions of Clay: Craft, Creativity and Scientific Process (APPPHYS 100)
WAY-CE, WAY-SMA

Students will create individual studio portfolios of ceramic work and pursue technical investigations of clay properties and the firing process using modern scientific equipment. Emphasis on development of creative process; parallels between science and traditional craft; integration of creative expression with scientific method and analysis. Prior ceramics experience desirable but not necessary. Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: any level of background in physics, Instructor permission.

ARTSINST 142
Drawing with Code (ARTSTUDI 163)
WAY-CE

This studio course will engage coding practices as drawing tools. What makes a good algorithmic composition? How do we craft rule-sets and parameters to shape an interesting work? What changes if we conceive of still outputs, ongoing processes, or interactive processes as the "finished" work? We will look at the history of algorithmic drawing, including analog precedents like Sol LeWitt and other conceptual artists, along with current pioneers like John Simon Jr., Casey Reas, and LIA. Outputs will involve prints as well as screen-based works. Some basic coding experience is helpful, but not required. Assignments are based on conceptual principals that students can engage with at different coding skill levels. This is a good way for non CS students to explore coding practices as well as for CS students to hone their skills. We will work primarily in the free Processing software for our explorations.

ARTSINST 142
Drawing with Code (ARTSTUDI 163)
WAY-CE

This studio course will engage coding practices as drawing tools. What makes a good algorithmic composition? How do we craft rule-sets and parameters to shape an interesting work? What changes if we conceive of still outputs, ongoing processes, or interactive processes as the "finished" work? We will look at the history of algorithmic drawing, including analog precedents like Sol LeWitt and other conceptual artists, along with current pioneers like John Simon Jr., Casey Reas, and LIA. Outputs will involve prints as well as screen-based works. Some basic coding experience is helpful, but not required. Assignments are based on conceptual principals that students can engage with at different coding skill levels. This is a good way for non CS students to explore coding practices as well as for CS students to hone their skills. We will work primarily in the free Processing software for our explorations.

ARTSINST 150G
Performing Race, Gender, and Sexuality (CSRE 150G, CSRE 350G, FEMGEN 150G, LIFE 150G, TAPS 150G)
WAY-CE, WAY-ED

In this theory and practice-based course, students will examine performances by and scholarly texts about artists who critically and mindfully engage race, gender, and sexuality. Students will cultivate their skills as artist-scholars through written assignments and the creation of performances in response to the assigned material. Attendance and written reflection about a live performance event on campus are required. Students will also learn various meditation practices as tools for making and critiquing performance, in both our seminar discussions and performance workshops. We will approach mindfulness as method and theory in our own practice, as well as in relation to the works studied. We will also consider the ethics and current debates concerning the mindfulness industry. Examples of artists studied include James Luna, Nao Bustamante, Renee Cox, William Pope.L, Cassils, boychild, Curious, Adrian Piper, Xandra Ibarra, Valérie Reding, Guillermo Gomez-Peña, and Ana Mendieta.

ARTSINST 172
Practice and Critique (ARTSINST 272)
WAY-CE

Appropriate for MFA candidates in Documentary Film or Art Practice or for advanced undergraduates working in visual art or time-based media, ¿Practice and Critique¿ is designed to enhance students' understanding of critical issues within their own work and the work of their peers. The artist and instructor will collaboratively direct feedback on work in progress. Feedback of finished work (or a completed component of a larger / thesis project) will follow a critique method developed by feminist artist and educator Mary Kelly in which the artist doesn't speak until the end of the session. We begin by reflecting on the affective, perceptual and phenomenological experiences engendered by the work. In doing so, we slow down our natural inclination to seek answers about ¿what the work (or film) means¿ by paying close attention to how it goes about producing meaning. In time, we proceed towards the denotative, referential and connotative meanings available to be read within the work. Finally we invite the artist to ask questions of the class and reflect upon their experience of the critique. Students will come away with a deeper and more nuanced understanding of how their work affects an audience. Optional one-on-one meetings with the instructor will provide opportunities for directed problem-solving and, depending on the goals and interests of students enrolled in the course, additional class time may be dedicated to screenings, field trips, studio visits or other activities.

ARTSTUDI 130
Interactive Art: Making it with Arduino (ARTSTUDI 231A)
WAY-CE

Students use electronics and software to create kinetic and interactive elements in artwork. No prior knowledge of electronics or software is required. Students learn to program the Arduino, a small easy-to-use microprocessor control unit ( see http://www.arduino.cc/ ). Learn to connect various sensors such as light, motion, sound and touch and use them to control software. Learn to interface actuators like motors, lights and solenoids to create movement. Learn to connect the Arduino to theMAX/MSP/Jitter programming environment to create media-intensive video and audio environments. Explore the social dimensions of electronic art. (lower level)

ARTSTUDI 130
Interactive Art: Making it with Arduino (ARTSTUDI 231A)
WAY-CE

Students use electronics and software to create kinetic and interactive elements in artwork. No prior knowledge of electronics or software is required. Students learn to program the Arduino, a small easy-to-use microprocessor control unit ( see http://www.arduino.cc/ ). Learn to connect various sensors such as light, motion, sound and touch and use them to control software. Learn to interface actuators like motors, lights and solenoids to create movement. Learn to connect the Arduino to theMAX/MSP/Jitter programming environment to create media-intensive video and audio environments. Explore the social dimensions of electronic art. (lower level)

ARTSTUDI 130
Interactive Art: Making it with Arduino (ARTSTUDI 231A)
WAY-CE

Students use electronics and software to create kinetic and interactive elements in artwork. No prior knowledge of electronics or software is required. Students learn to program the Arduino, a small easy-to-use microprocessor control unit ( see http://www.arduino.cc/ ). Learn to connect various sensors such as light, motion, sound and touch and use them to control software. Learn to interface actuators like motors, lights and solenoids to create movement. Learn to connect the Arduino to theMAX/MSP/Jitter programming environment to create media-intensive video and audio environments. Explore the social dimensions of electronic art. (lower level)

ARTSTUDI 131
Sound Art I (MUSIC 154A)
GER:DB-Hum, WAY-CE

Acoustic, digital and analog approaches to sound art. Familiarization with techniques of listening, recording, digital processing and production. Required listening and readings in the history and contemporary practice of sound art. (lower level)

ARTSTUDI 131
Sound Art I (MUSIC 154A)
GER:DB-Hum, WAY-CE

Acoustic, digital and analog approaches to sound art. Familiarization with techniques of listening, recording, digital processing and production. Required listening and readings in the history and contemporary practice of sound art. (lower level)

ARTSTUDI 131
Sound Art I (MUSIC 154A)
GER:DB-Hum, WAY-CE

Acoustic, digital and analog approaches to sound art. Familiarization with techniques of listening, recording, digital processing and production. Required listening and readings in the history and contemporary practice of sound art. (lower level)

ARTSTUDI 136
The Portable Studio
WAY-CE

With a decrease in available real estate and an increase in virtual real estate via the Internet and new technologies, contemporary artists are developing new means of creative production that do not necessarily require the use of a traditional art studio. This interdisciplinary course follows this line of thought and will function as a means to explore systems of art-making through nomadic practices outside of the traditional art studio. The overall goal of this course is to challenge students to think differently about the nature of studio practice, where they will explore themes of public versus private, and physical versus virtual space through the creation of time-based artwork. By way of lectures, readings, and class assignments students will be introduced to sound, video, social practice, and performance art that will be developed and presented though unconventional means with an emphasis on site. No previous experience required.

ARTSTUDI 136
The Portable Studio
WAY-CE

With a decrease in available real estate and an increase in virtual real estate via the Internet and new technologies, contemporary artists are developing new means of creative production that do not necessarily require the use of a traditional art studio. This interdisciplinary course follows this line of thought and will function as a means to explore systems of art-making through nomadic practices outside of the traditional art studio. The overall goal of this course is to challenge students to think differently about the nature of studio practice, where they will explore themes of public versus private, and physical versus virtual space through the creation of time-based artwork. By way of lectures, readings, and class assignments students will be introduced to sound, video, social practice, and performance art that will be developed and presented though unconventional means with an emphasis on site. No previous experience required.

ARTSTUDI 136
The Portable Studio
WAY-CE

Using the concept behind the Post-Studio art practice as a starting point, this course will explore what it means to make art outside (in a landscape/cityscape, etc.) instead of inside the traditional Art Studio. With technology and equipment getting smaller and more handy and with the endless stream of apps and functions available on cell phones and other mobile devices, this course will furthermore investigate how this gives the artist the ability to work on the fly and produce most of their artwork on site. Given the interdisciplinary nature of this course, the students will be given 3 assignments throughout this course, where they will be introduced to sound, video, photography, and performance art. The goal of this course is to challenge the students to think differently about the use of their mobile devices and tablets and to be creative and experimental on the spot.

ARTSTUDI 139
Portraiture and Facial Anatomy for Artists (SURG 241)
WAY-CE

Focus is on the art of portraiture and underlying structures of the face, fundamental anatomical elements such as the skull and muscles of facial expressions, and the intersections between human anatomy and art. Studio sessions incorporate plastic models, dry bones, cadaveric specimens, and live models. Encourages use of proper anatomical terminology for describing structures and their relationships.

ARTSTUDI 139
Portraiture and Facial Anatomy for Artists (SURG 241)
WAY-CE

Focus is on the art of portraiture and underlying structures of the face, fundamental anatomical elements such as the skull and muscles of facial expressions, and the intersections between human anatomy and art. Studio sessions incorporate plastic models, dry bones, cadaveric specimens, and live models. Encourages use of proper anatomical terminology for describing structures and their relationships.

ARTSTUDI 140
Drawing I
WAY-CE

Functional anatomy and perspective as they apply to problems of drawing the form in space. Individual and group instruction as students work from still life set-ups, nature, and the model. Emphasis is on the development of critical skills and perceptual drawing techniques for those with little or no previous experience with pastels, inks, charcoal, conte, and pencil. Lectures alternate with studio work. (lower level)

ARTSTUDI 140
Drawing I
WAY-CE

Functional anatomy and perspective as they apply to problems of drawing the form in space. Individual and group instruction as students work from still life set-ups, nature, and the model. Emphasis is on the development of critical skills and perceptual drawing techniques for those with little or no previous experience with pastels, inks, charcoal, conte, and pencil. Lectures alternate with studio work. (lower level)

ARTSTUDI 140
Drawing I
WAY-CE

Functional anatomy and perspective as they apply to problems of drawing the form in space. Individual and group instruction as students work from still life set-ups, nature, and the model. Emphasis is on the development of critical skills and perceptual drawing techniques for those with little or no previous experience with pastels, inks, charcoal, conte, and pencil. Lectures alternate with studio work. (lower level)

ARTSTUDI 140
Drawing I
WAY-CE

Functional anatomy and perspective as they apply to problems of drawing the form in space. Individual and group instruction as students work from still life set-ups, nature, and the model. Emphasis is on the development of critical skills and perceptual drawing techniques for those with little or no previous experience with pastels, inks, charcoal, conte, and pencil. Lectures alternate with studio work. (lower level)

ARTSTUDI 141
Plein Air Painting
WAY-CE

Plein Air (Outdoor) Painting is a wonderful way to build skills, explore your relationship to site, and unlock your voice and hand. We will paint at different locations on and off-campus, learning a variety of painting techniques in changing weather and light. This class is great for both true beginners and advanced students. Basic painting skills are incorporated throughout the quarter, with advanced options at each stage. Acrylic paint is versatile and fast-drying; we will use it to get a range of effects from washy watercolor, blended oil effects, and building the surface sculpturally, painting on different surfaces. As we move, we will consider the elements of site and the materiality of paint: water, earth, architecture and the nuance of human gesture. History and memory are parsed in both the visible and hidden worlds around us. On-site paintings are not touched after class; rather they exist as an ephemeral moments in time. Three outside projects allow each person to paint at their own pace, and spend more time developing ideas and skills. In this class, process is privileged and ¿failure¿ is embraced. Adventure is our priority; weather is our co-creator. Final projects will be based on individual concepts, allowing each person to stretch creatively and develop their own voice.

ARTSTUDI 141
Plein Air Painting Now
WAY-CE

Surrounded by so many technologies for image production, why choose to take a course based on a style of painting developed over a hundred years ago? The standard answer to this question has changed remarkably little. Rather than answering that the camera cannot capture what the eye sees, we might instead respond that neither the computer, nor the camera, nor video, can reproduce in paint the subjective gaze of the contemporary viewer. Contained within this answer lies the trajectory for the class "PLEIN AIR PAINTING NOW!"nnIn this course students will be introduced to various water based media appropriate for plein air painting and learn various techniques and strategies for making paintings outdoors. The course will include the traditional discussions of brushes, paints, the different types of supports as well as easels, umbrellas and chairs. A broad variety of painting techniques will be demonstrated. We will set up in various locations around campus, paying particular attention to the specifics of the siteas this will serve as the jumping off point for discussion of the readings that form the second component of the class.nnPlease note that this class takes place outdoors. Plan accordingly, as we will be meeting in various locations around campus, and will be subject to inclement weather.Freshmen and Sophomores receive priority for enrollment. This is a designated CREATIVE EXPRESSIONS course.

ARTSTUDI 141
Plein Air Painting
WAY-CE

Plein Air (Outdoor) Painting is a wonderful way to build skills, explore your relationship to site, and unlock your voice and hand. We will paint at different locations on and off-campus, learning a variety of painting techniques in changing weather and light. This class is great for both true beginners and advanced students. Basic painting skills are incorporated throughout the quarter, with advanced options at each stage. Acrylic paint is versatile and fast-drying; we will use it to get a range of effects from washy watercolor, blended oil effects, and building the surface sculpturally, painting on different surfaces. As we move, we will consider the elements of site and the materiality of paint: water, earth, architecture and the nuance of human gesture. History and memory are parsed in both the visible and hidden worlds around us. On-site paintings are not touched after class; rather they exist as an ephemeral moments in time. Three outside projects allow each person to paint at their own pace, and spend more time developing ideas and skills. In this class, process is privileged and ¿failure¿ is embraced. Adventure is our priority; weather is our co-creator. Final projects will be based on individual concepts, allowing each person to stretch creatively and develop their own voice.

ARTSTUDI 141
Plein Air Painting
WAY-CE

Plein Air (Outdoor) Painting is a wonderful way to build skills, explore your relationship to site, and unlock your voice and hand. We will paint at different locations on and off-campus, learning a variety of painting techniques in changing weather and light. This class is great for both true beginners and advanced students. Basic painting skills are incorporated throughout the quarter, with advanced options at each stage. Acrylic paint is versatile and fast-drying; we will use it to get a range of effects from washy watercolor, blended oil effects, and building the surface sculpturally, painting on different surfaces. As we move, we will consider the elements of site and the materiality of paint: water, earth, architecture and the nuance of human gesture. History and memory are parsed in both the visible and hidden worlds around us. On-site paintings are not touched after class; rather they exist as an ephemeral moments in time. Three outside projects allow each person to paint at their own pace, and spend more time developing ideas and skills. In this class, process is privileged and ¿failure¿ is embraced. Adventure is our priority; weather is our co-creator. Final projects will be based on individual concepts, allowing each person to stretch creatively and develop their own voice.

ARTSTUDI 141S
Drawing Outdoors
WAY-CE

In this introductory class, we take drawing out into the world, exploring different environments, techniques, and approaches as we go. The fundamental nuts-and-bolts of basic drawing techniques: light logic, depicting depth and drawing the figure, are integrated into each environment. From the Stanford campus: its cafe's, architecture and landscaping, to redwoods and water, to more urban settings, drawings will range from high-speed gestures to longer, more contemplative work. Through pen, graphite, charcoal, ink, watercolor/gouache and mixed media, we explore dichotomous relationships, as well as those in seemingly perfect harmony. We move from the inanimate to animate, figure and architecture, motion and stillness, to the micro and macro, considering how even the smallest patch of earth may be as monumental as Hoover Tower. Both beginning and advanced students are welcome. Summer.

ARTSTUDI 141S
Drawing Outdoors
WAY-CE

In this introductory class, we take drawing out into the world, exploring different environments, techniques, and approaches as we go. The fundamental nuts-and-bolts of basic drawing techniques: light logic, depicting depth and drawing the figure, are integrated into each environment. From the Stanford campus: its cafe's, architecture and landscaping, to redwoods and water, to more urban settings, drawings will range from high-speed gestures to longer, more contemplative work. Through pen, graphite, charcoal, ink, watercolor/gouache and mixed media, we explore dichotomous relationships, as well as those in seemingly perfect harmony. We move from the inanimate to animate, figure and architecture, motion and stillness, to the micro and macro, considering how even the smallest patch of earth may be as monumental as Hoover Tower. Both beginning and advanced students are welcome. Summer.

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