Explore Social Inquiry (SI) WAYS Courses

Ways of Thinking/Ways of Doing

Title Requirements
AMSTUD 150C
The United States in the Twentieth Century (AFRICAAM 150C, HISTORY 150C)
GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

(Same as HISTORY 50C. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 150C.) 100 years ago, women and most African-Americans couldn't vote; automobiles were rare and computers didn't exist; and the U.S. was a minor power in a world dominated by European empires. This course surveys politics, culture, and social movements to answer the question: How did we get from there to here? Two historical research "labs" or archival sessions focus on the Great Depression in the 1930s and radical and conservative students movements of the 1960s. Suitable for non-majors and majors alike.

AMSTUD 150X
From Gold Rush to Google Bus: History of San Francisco (HISTORY 252E, URBANST 150)
WAY-ED, WAY-SI

This class will examine the history of San Francisco from Native American and colonial settlement through the present. Focus is on social, environmental, and political history, with the theme of power in the city. Topics include Native Americans, the Gold Rush, immigration and nativism, railroads and robber barons, earthquake and fire, progressive reform and unionism, gender, race and civil rights, sexuality and politics, counterculture, redevelopment and gentrification. Students write final project in collaboration with ShapingSF, a participatory community history project documenting and archiving overlooked stories and memories of San Francisco. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)

AMSTUD 150X
From Gold Rush to Google Bus: History of San Francisco (HISTORY 252E, URBANST 150)
WAY-ED, WAY-SI

This class will examine the history of San Francisco from Native American and colonial settlement through the present. Focus is on social, environmental, and political history, with the theme of power in the city. Topics include Native Americans, the Gold Rush, immigration and nativism, railroads and robber barons, earthquake and fire, progressive reform and unionism, gender, race and civil rights, sexuality and politics, counterculture, redevelopment and gentrification. Students write final project in collaboration with ShapingSF, a participatory community history project documenting and archiving overlooked stories and memories of San Francisco. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)

AMSTUD 155D
The Asian American Movement: A History of Activism (ASNAMST 55D, ASNAMST 155D, HISTORY 55D, HISTORY 155D)
WAY-ED, WAY-SI

The "Asian American Movement" was born in the late 1960s inspired by other movements for social change and justice in the era. Activism among Asians in America has a longer history and a continuity to today. We will examine past, present, and future and consider issues of racial/ethnic identity, of inequality, and of injustice. And we will explore avenues that sought remedy and progress. Political, social, cultural, gender and sexuality, and international dimensions will be considered.

AMSTUD 155F
The Civil War and Reconstruction Era, 1830 to 1877 (AFRICAAM 55F, AMSTUD 55F, HISTORY 55F, HISTORY 155F)
WAY-ED, WAY-SI

(History 55F is 3 units; History 155F is 5 units.)This course explores the causes, course, and consequences of the American Civil War. The Civil War profoundly impacted American life at national, sectional, and constitutional levels, and radically challenged categories of race and citizenship. Topics covered include: the crisis of union and disunion in an expanding republic; slavery, race, and emancipation as national problems and personal experiences; the horrors of total war for individuals and society; and the challenges--social and political--of Reconstruction.

AMSTUD 155F
The Civil War and Reconstruction Era, 1830 to 1877 (AFRICAAM 55F, AMSTUD 55F, HISTORY 55F, HISTORY 155F)
WAY-ED, WAY-SI

(History 55F is 3 units; History 155F is 5 units.)This course explores the causes, course, and consequences of the American Civil War. The Civil War profoundly impacted American life at national, sectional, and constitutional levels, and radically challenged categories of race and citizenship. Topics covered include: the crisis of union and disunion in an expanding republic; slavery, race, and emancipation as national problems and personal experiences; the horrors of total war for individuals and society; and the challenges--social and political--of Reconstruction.

AMSTUD 156H
Women and Medicine in US History: Women as Patients, Healers and Doctors (FEMGEN 156H)
GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

This course explores ideas about women's bodies in sickness and health, as well as women's encounters with lay and professional healers in the United States from the eighteenth century to the present. We begin with healthy women and explore ideas about women's life cycle in the past, including women's sexuality, the history of birth control, abortion, childbirth, and aging. We then turn to the history of women healers including midwives, lay physicians, professional physicians and nurses. Finally, we examine women's illnesses and their treatment as well as the lives of women with disabilities in the past. We will examine differences in women's experience with medicine on the basis of race, ethnicity, sexuality and class. We will relate this history to issues in contemporary medicine, and consider the efforts of women to gain control of their bodies and health care throughout US history.

AMSTUD 156H
Women and Medicine in US History: Women as Patients, Healers and Doctors (FEMGEN 156H)
GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

This course explores ideas about women's bodies in sickness and health, as well as women's encounters with lay and professional healers in the United States from the eighteenth century to the present. We begin with healthy women and explore ideas about women's life cycle in the past, including women's sexuality, the history of birth control, abortion, childbirth, and aging. We then turn to the history of women healers including midwives, lay physicians, professional physicians and nurses. Finally, we examine women's illnesses and their treatment as well as the lives of women with disabilities in the past. We will examine differences in women's experience with medicine on the basis of race, ethnicity, sexuality and class. We will relate this history to issues in contemporary medicine, and consider the efforts of women to gain control of their bodies and health care throughout US history.

AMSTUD 156H
Women and Medicine in US History: Women as Patients, Healers and Doctors (FEMGEN 156H)
GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

This course explores ideas about women's bodies in sickness and health, as well as women's encounters with lay and professional healers in the United States from the eighteenth century to the present. We begin with healthy women and explore ideas about women's life cycle in the past, including women's sexuality, the history of birth control, abortion, childbirth, and aging. We then turn to the history of women healers including midwives, lay physicians, professional physicians and nurses. Finally, we examine women's illnesses and their treatment as well as the lives of women with disabilities in the past. We will examine differences in women's experience with medicine on the basis of race, ethnicity, sexuality and class. We will relate this history to issues in contemporary medicine, and consider the efforts of women to gain control of their bodies and health care throughout US history.

AMSTUD 157X
Language as Political Tool: Feminist and LGBTQ Movements and Impacts (FEMGEN 157, FEMGEN 257)
WAY-ED, WAY-SI

How does a social or political movement gain traction? For example, how did 20th-century movements of the disenfranchised, such as the Civil Rights movement, LGBTQ movements, or feminist movements, gain a voice and eventually enact change? In the mediascape of today, where everyone with access to a computer could have a voice, how does a movement change the national conversation? How do written and verbal choices of the movements impact their success and outreach to supporters? In this course, students will write and revise their own arguments in order to best understand the rhetorical potential in these movements¿ choices and to consider how those rhetorical moves are incorporated into political discourse. We'll examine the role of rhetoric, the use of argument to persuade, in social movements working toward social justice, party platforms, and public policy.

AMSTUD 160
Perspectives on American Identity (ENGLISH 165)
GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

Required for American Studies majors. In this seminar we trace diverse and changing interpretations of American identity by exploring autobiographical, literary, and/or visual texts from the 18th through the 20th century in conversation with sociological, political, and historical accounts. *Fulfills Writing In the Major Requirement for American Studies Majors*

AMSTUD 160
Perspectives on American Identity (ENGLISH 165)
GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

Required for American Studies majors. In this seminar we trace diverse and changing interpretations of American identity by exploring autobiographical, literary, and/or visual texts from the 18th through the 20th century in conversation with sociological, political, and historical accounts. *Fulfills Writing In the Major Requirement for American Studies Majors*

AMSTUD 160
Perspectives on American Identity (ENGLISH 165)
GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

Required for American Studies majors. In this seminar we trace diverse and changing interpretations of American identity by exploring autobiographical, literary, and/or visual texts from the 18th through the 20th century in conversation with sociological, political, and historical accounts. *Fulfills Writing In the Major Requirement for American Studies Majors*

AMSTUD 161
The Politics of Sex: Work, Family, and Citizenship in Modern American Women's History (CSRE 162, FEMGEN 161, HISTORY 61, HISTORY 161)
GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

This course explores the transition from Victorian to modern American womanhood by asking how Native, European, African, Mexican, and Asian American women navigated the changing sexual, economic, and political landscapes of the twentieth century. Through secondary readings, primary sources, films, music, and literature we explore the opportunities and boundaries on groups of women in the context of historical events that included immigration, urbanization, wartime, depression, the Cold War, as well as recurrent feminist and conservative political movements.

AMSTUD 161
The Politics of Sex: Work, Family, and Citizenship in Modern American Women's History (CSRE 162, FEMGEN 161, HISTORY 61, HISTORY 161)
GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

This course explores the transition from Victorian to modern American womanhood by asking how Native, European, African, Mexican, and Asian American women navigated the changing sexual, economic, and political landscapes of the twentieth century. Through secondary readings, primary sources, films, music, and literature we explore the opportunities and boundaries on groups of women in the context of historical events that included immigration, urbanization, wartime, depression, the Cold War, as well as recurrent feminist and conservative political movements.

AMSTUD 1B
Media, Culture, and Society (COMM 1B)
GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

The institutions and practices of mass media, including television, film, radio, and digital media, and their role in shaping culture and social life. The media's shifting relationships to politics, commerce, and identity.

AMSTUD 1B
Media, Culture, and Society (COMM 1B)
GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

The institutions and practices of mass media, including television, film, radio, and digital media, and their role in shaping culture and social life. The media's shifting relationships to politics, commerce, and identity.

AMSTUD 218
Islam, Race and Revolution: A Pan-American Approach (CSRE 218, RELIGST 218, RELIGST 318)
WAY-ED, WAY-SI

Taking a pan-American approach to the study of religious traditions, this upper-level course traces the history of the critical intersection between race, religion and revolution among Muslims from the turn of the nineteenth century until the present day. Moving from the Atlantic Revolutions of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, to the United States, to the decolonizing Third World, and then finally to the contemporary Middle East, this class will emphasize that Islam and race together have been used by many groups in order to challenge existing power structures, agitate for change, and more than occasionally, transform the social, cultural and governmental structures comprising their worlds. Moreover, although this class is concentrated upon religious formations in the Americas, students will explore global events throughout the Muslim world in order to examine how global politics contribute to religious formations, solidarities and identities. At the conclusion of this course, students will be expected to write a 10-15 page research paper, and a topic will be chosen in consultation with the instructor. Students will also be expected to write weekly reflection papers, which will serve to facilitate class discussion. Undergraduates register for 200-level for 5 units. Graduate students register for 300-level for 3-5 units.

AMSTUD 246
Constructing Race and Religion in America (AFRICAAM 236, CSRE 246, HISTORY 256G, HISTORY 356G, RELIGST 246, RELIGST 346)
GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

This seminar focuses on the interrelationships between social constructions of race, and social interpretations of religion in America. How have assumptions about race shaped religious worldviews? How have religious beliefs shaped racial attitudes? How have ideas about religion and race contributed to notions of what it means to be "American"? We will look at primary and secondary sources, and at the historical development of ideas and practices over time.

AMSTUD 261
Personal Narratives in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (FEMGEN 261, FEMGEN 361)
WAY-ED, WAY-SI

This course explores the contribution of personal narratives to knowledge in the field of feminist, gender, and sexuality studies. Each week, students do extensive readings of exemplary personal narratives that have contributed in substance and method to the field and that have opened up new areas of inquiry. These narratives deal especially with issues of individual and group identity; gender, sexuality, racial and ethnic diversity; and disability. Students select a topic of special interest to them to focus their readings and guide individual research during the quarter. The approach of the course is feminist, ethnographic, and welcoming of a variety of approaches to personal narrative. Instructor consent required; students apply at the first class meeting.

AMSTUD 55F
The Civil War and Reconstruction Era, 1830 to 1877 (AFRICAAM 55F, AMSTUD 155F, HISTORY 55F, HISTORY 155F)
WAY-ED, WAY-SI

(History 55F is 3 units; History 155F is 5 units.)This course explores the causes, course, and consequences of the American Civil War. The Civil War profoundly impacted American life at national, sectional, and constitutional levels, and radically challenged categories of race and citizenship. Topics covered include: the crisis of union and disunion in an expanding republic; slavery, race, and emancipation as national problems and personal experiences; the horrors of total war for individuals and society; and the challenges--social and political--of Reconstruction.

AMSTUD 55F
The Civil War and Reconstruction Era, 1830 to 1877 (AFRICAAM 55F, AMSTUD 155F, HISTORY 55F, HISTORY 155F)
WAY-ED, WAY-SI

(History 55F is 3 units; History 155F is 5 units.)This course explores the causes, course, and consequences of the American Civil War. The Civil War profoundly impacted American life at national, sectional, and constitutional levels, and radically challenged categories of race and citizenship. Topics covered include: the crisis of union and disunion in an expanding republic; slavery, race, and emancipation as national problems and personal experiences; the horrors of total war for individuals and society; and the challenges--social and political--of Reconstruction.

AMSTUD 73
Mexican Migration to the United States (CHILATST 173, HISTORY 73, HISTORY 173)
WAY-ED, WAY-SI

(History 73 is 3 units; History 173 is 5 units.) This class examines the history of Mexican migration to the United States. In the United States we constantly hear about Obama's immigration plan, the anti-immigrant laws in Arizona, and the courage of DREAM Activists; in Mexico news sources speak about the role of remittances, the effect of deportations, and the loss of life at the border. Unfortunately, few people truly understand the historical trends in these migratory processes, or the multifaceted role played by the United States in encouraging individuals to head there. Moreover, few people have actually heard the opinions and voices of migrants themselves. This course seeks to provide students with the opportunity to place migrants' experiences in dialogue with migratory laws as well as the knowledge to embed current understandings of Latin American migration in their meaningful historical context.

AMSTUD 91
Exploring American Religious History (CSRE 91, HISTORY 260K, RELIGST 91)
WAY-ED, WAY-SI

This course will trace how contemporary beliefs and practices connect to historical trends in the American religious landscape.

ANTHRO 1
Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology (ANTHRO 201)
GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

This course introduces basic anthropological concepts and presents the discipline's distinctive perspective on society and culture. The power of this perspective is illustrated by exploring vividly-written ethnographic cases that show how anthropological approaches illuminate contemporary social and political issues in a range of different cultural sites.

ANTHRO 1
Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology (ANTHRO 201)
GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

This course introduces basic anthropological concepts and presents the discipline¿s distinctive perspective on society and culture. The power of this perspective is illustrated by exploring vividly-written ethnographic cases that show how anthropological approaches illuminate contemporary social and political issues in a range of different cultural sites.

ANTHRO 1
Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology (ANTHRO 201)
GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

This course introduces basic anthropological concepts and presents the discipline¿s distinctive perspective on society and culture. The power of this perspective is illustrated by exploring vividly-written ethnographic cases that show how anthropological approaches illuminate contemporary social and political issues in a range of different cultural sites.

ANTHRO 1
Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology (ANTHRO 201)
GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

This course introduces basic anthropological concepts and presents the discipline's distinctive perspective on society and culture. The power of this perspective is illustrated by exploring vividly-written ethnographic cases that show how anthropological approaches illuminate contemporary social and political issues in a range of different cultural sites.

ANTHRO 101S
Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology (ANTHRO 1S)
GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

This course introduces basic anthropological concepts and presents the discipline's distinctive perspective on society and culture. The power of this perspective is illustrated by exploring vividly-written ethnographic cases that show how anthropological approaches illuminate contemporary social and political issues in a range of different cultural sites.

ANTHRO 101S
Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology (ANTHRO 1S)
GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

This course introduces basic anthropological concepts and presents the discipline's distinctive perspective on society and culture. The power of this perspective is illustrated by exploring vividly-written ethnographic cases that show how anthropological approaches illuminate contemporary social and political issues in a range of different cultural sites.

ANTHRO 106
Incas and their Ancestors: Peruvian Archaeology (ANTHRO 206A, ARCHLGY 102B)
GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

The development of high civilizations in Andean S. America from hunter-gatherer origins to the powerful, expansive Inca empire. The contrasting ecologies of coast, sierra, and jungle areas of early Peruvian societies from 12,000 to 2,000 B.C.E. The domestication of indigenous plants which provided the economic foundation for monumental cities, ceramics, and textiles. Cultural evolution, and why and how major transformations occurred.

ANTHRO 106
Incas and their Ancestors: Peruvian Archaeology (ANTHRO 206A, ARCHLGY 102B)
GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

The development of high civilizations in Andean S. America from hunter-gatherer origins to the powerful, expansive Inca empire. The contrasting ecologies of coast, sierra, and jungle areas of early Peruvian societies from 12,000 to 2,000 B.C.E. The domestication of indigenous plants which provided the economic foundation for monumental cities, ceramics, and textiles. Cultural evolution, and why and how major transformations occurred.

ANTHRO 106
Incas and their Ancestors: Peruvian Archaeology (ANTHRO 206A, ARCHLGY 102B)
GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

The development of high civilizations in Andean S. America from hunter-gatherer origins to the powerful, expansive Inca empire. The contrasting ecologies of coast, sierra, and jungle areas of early Peruvian societies from 12,000 to 2,000 B.C.E. The domestication of indigenous plants which provided the economic foundation for monumental cities, ceramics, and textiles. Cultural evolution, and why and how major transformations occurred.

ANTHRO 111
Archaeology of Gender and Sexuality (ARCHLGY 129, FEMGEN 119)
WAY-ED, WAY-SI

How archaeologists study sex, sexuality, and gender through the material remains left behind by past cultures and communities. Theoretical and methodological issues; case studies from prehistoric and historic archaeology.

ANTHRO 115
The Social life of Human Bones (ANTHRO 215, ARCHLGY 115)
WAY-SI

Skeletal remains serve a primary function of support and protection for the human body. However, beyond this, they have played a range of social roles once an individual is deceased. The processes associated with excarnation, interment, exhumation and reburial all speak to the place that the body, and its parts, play in our cultural as well as physical landscape.n This course builds on introductory courses in human skeletal anatomy by adding the social dynamics that govern the way humans treat other humans once they have died. It draws on anthropological, biological and archaeological research, with case studies spanning a broad chronological and spatial framework to provide students with an overview of social practice as it relates to the human body.

ANTHRO 116C
Native Americans in the 21st Century: Encounters, Identity, and Sovereignty in Contemporary America (ANTHRO 16, ARCHLGY 16, NATIVEAM 16)
GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

What does it mean to be a Native American in the 21st century? Beyond traditional portrayals of military conquests, cultural collapse, and assimilation, the relationships between Native Americans and American society. Focus is on three themes leading to in-class moot court trials: colonial encounters and colonizing discourses; frontiers and boundaries; and sovereignty of self and nation. Topics include gender in native communities, American Indian law, readings by native authors, and Indians in film and popular culture.

ANTHRO 126
Urban Culture in Global Perspective (URBANST 114)
GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

Core course for Urban Studies majors. We will study urban space both historically and cross-culturally. Urban Studies, by definition, is an interdisciplinary field, where the methodological approaches draw upon a diverse set of analytic tools. Disciplines that occupy a prominent place in this class are geography, cultural anthropology, sociology, history, media studies, and literature. In this context, we will discuss the importance of cities around the world to the economic, cultural, and political well-being of modern societies and examine how forces such as industrialization, decentralization, and globalization affect the structure and function of cities.

ANTHRO 126
Urban Culture in Global Perspective (URBANST 114)
GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

Core course for Urban Studies majors. A majority of the world's population now live in urban areas and most of the rapid urbanization has taken place in mega-cities outside the Western world. This course explores urban cultures, identities, spatial practices and forms of urban power and imagination in Asia, Africa and Latin America.nParticipants will be introduced to a global history of urban development that demonstrates how the legacies of colonialism, modernization theory and global race thinking have shaped urban designs and urban life in most of the world. Students will also be introduced to interpretative and qualitative approaches to urban life that affords an understanding of important, if unquantifiable, vectors of urban life: stereotypes, fear, identity formations, utopia, social segregation and aspirations.

ANTHRO 127D
HERITAGE POLITICS (ARCHLGY 127, ARCHLGY 227)
WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

Heritage is a matter of the heart and not the brain, David Lowenthal once said. It does not seek to explore the past, but to domesticate it and enlist it for present causes. From the drafting of the first royal decrees on ancient monuments in the 17th century, political interests have had a hand in deciding which traditions, monuments and sites best represent and best serve the needs of the nation. The sum of these domestication efforts, the laws, institutions and practices established to protect and manage heritage, is what we call heritage governance. In this seminar you will learn about the politics of 21st century heritage governance at national and international level. Students will become familiar with key conventions and learn about the functioning of heritage institutions. We will also examine the hidden practices and current political developments that impact heritage governance: how UNESCO heritage sites become bargaining tools in international relations, how EU heritage policies are negotiated in the corridors of Brussels, and how the current re-nationalization of Western politics can affect what we come to know as our common past.

ANTHRO 130D
Spatial Approaches to Social Science (ANTHRO 230D, POLISCI 241S, URBANST 124)
WAY-AQR, WAY-SI

This multidisciplinary course combines different approaches to how GIS and spatial tools can be applied in social science research. We take a collaborative, project oriented approach to bring together technical expertise and substantive applications from several social science disciplines. The course aims to integrate tools, methods, and current debates in social science research and will enable students to engage in critical spatial research and a multidisciplinary dialogue around geographic space.

ANTHRO 130D
Spatial Approaches to Social Science (ANTHRO 230D, POLISCI 241S, URBANST 124)
WAY-AQR, WAY-SI

This multidisciplinary course combines different approaches to how GIS and spatial tools can be applied in social science research. We take a collaborative, project oriented approach to bring together technical expertise and substantive applications from several social science disciplines. The course aims to integrate tools, methods, and current debates in social science research and will enable students to engage in critical spatial research and a multidisciplinary dialogue around geographic space.

ANTHRO 132
Religion and Politics in the Muslim World
GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

This course provides an ethnographic examination of religion and politics in the Muslim world. What is the role of Islam in the political life of modern Muslim societies? Conversely, how do modern political powers shape and constrain the terms of religious life? This course takes an anthropological perspective on the study of Islam: our investigations will not focus on the origins of scriptures and doctrines but rather on the use of religious texts and signs in social context and on the political significance of ritual and bodily practices. A major aim of the course is provide students with analytical resources for thinking critically about the history and politics of modern Muslim societies, with a particular focus on issues of religious authority, gender and sexuality, and the politics of secularism.

ANTHRO 133
Masculinity: Technologies and Cultures of Gender (ANTHRO 233, FEMGEN 133M)
GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

What is masculinity? How are masculinities invested with power and meaning in cultural contexts? How is anthropological attention to them informed by and extending inquiry across the academy in spheres such as culture studies, political theory, gender studies, history, and science and technology studies? Limited enrollment.

ANTHRO 148
Health, Politics, and Culture of Modern China (ANTHRO 248, CHINA 155A, CHINA 255A)
GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

One of the most generative regions for medical anthropology inquiry in recent years has been Asia. This seminar is designed to introduce upper division undergraduates and graduate students to the methodological hurdles, representational challenges, and intellectual rewards of investigating the intersections of health, politics, and culture in contemporary China.

ANTHRO 148
Health, Politics, and Culture of Modern China (ANTHRO 248, CHINA 155A, CHINA 255A)
GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

One of the most generative regions for medical anthropology inquiry in recent years has been Asia. This seminar is designed to introduce upper division undergraduates and graduate students to the methodological hurdles, representational challenges, and intellectual rewards of investigating the intersections of health, politics, and culture in contemporary China.

ANTHRO 153
Asylum: Knowledge, Politics, and Population (CSRE 153C)
WAY-ER, WAY-SI

This course draws from ethnography, social theory, media and literature to examines the place of the asylum in the constitution of knowledge, politics, and populations. An ancient juridical concept, asylum has been used to describe a fundamental political right, medical and penal institutions, as well as emergent spaces of care and safety. As such, thus course invites students to think of critical issues associated with asylum, including: illness, trauma, violence, immigration, displacement, human rights, sanctuary, and testimony.

ANTHRO 16
Native Americans in the 21st Century: Encounters, Identity, and Sovereignty in Contemporary America (ARCHLGY 16, NATIVEAM 16)
GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

What does it mean to be a Native American in the 21st century? Beyond traditional portrayals of military conquests, cultural collapse, and assimilation, the relationships between Native Americans and American society. Focus is on three themes leading to in-class moot court trials: colonial encounters and colonizing discourses; frontiers and boundaries; and sovereignty of self and nation. Topics include gender in native communities, American Indian law, readings by native authors, and Indians in film and popular culture.

ANTHRO 16
Native Americans in the 21st Century: Encounters, Identity, and Sovereignty in Contemporary America (ANTHRO 116C, ARCHLGY 16, NATIVEAM 16)
GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

What does it mean to be a Native American in the 21st century? Beyond traditional portrayals of military conquests, cultural collapse, and assimilation, the relationships between Native Americans and American society. Focus is on three themes leading to in-class moot court trials: colonial encounters and colonizing discourses; frontiers and boundaries; and sovereignty of self and nation. Topics include gender in native communities, American Indian law, readings by native authors, and Indians in film and popular culture.

ANTHRO 16
Native Americans in the 21st Century: Encounters, Identity, and Sovereignty in Contemporary America (ARCHLGY 16, NATIVEAM 16)
GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

What does it mean to be a Native American in the 21st century? Beyond traditional portrayals of military conquests, cultural collapse, and assimilation, the relationships between Native Americans and American society. Focus is on three themes leading to in-class moot court trials: colonial encounters and colonizing discourses; frontiers and boundaries; and sovereignty of self and nation. Topics include gender in native communities, American Indian law, readings by native authors, and Indians in film and popular culture.

ANTHRO 181
Religion and Science in the Amazon and Elsewhere (ANTHRO 281, RELIGST 270X, RELIGST 370X)
WAY-SI

The conversion of native peoples to Christianity, especially Evangelical Christianity, is today a global phenomenon. This course looks to understand the reasons for religious conversion and its consequence in the everyday and ritual practices of Amazonians and their traditional practice of shamanism. We then turn to a question seldom addressed in the literature on conversion: the relationship between religion and science. We will explore the way conversion to Christianity produces changes in conceptions of the world and the person similar to those produced by access to scientific knowledge, which occurs primarily through schooling.

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